Mark D. Howard

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Tumbling again.  Actually, I just wanted to hear some Stones.

Rolling Stones:  Tumbling Dice from Exile on Main Street [The BEST rock n roll album ever]

Vivaldi’s Winter played by Romano Viazzani

Jul 2
Massacre of the Innocents, late 10th century
__________
When Herod saw that he had been tricked by the wise men, he was infuriated, and he sent and killed all the children in and around Bethlehem who were two years old or under, according to the time that he had learned from the wise men. Then was fulfilled what had been spoken through the prophet Jeremiah: A voice was heard in Ramah, wailing and loud lamentation, Rachel weeping for her children; she refused to be consoled, because they are no more.
—Matthew 2:16-18

Massacre of the Innocents, late 10th century

__________

When Herod saw that he had been tricked by the wise men, he was infuriated, and he sent and killed all the children in and around Bethlehem who were two years old or under, according to the time that he had learned from the wise men. Then was fulfilled what had been spoken through the prophet Jeremiah: A voice was heard in Ramah, wailing and loud lamentation, Rachel weeping for her children; she refused to be consoled, because they are no more.

—Matthew 2:16-18

Bob Cratchit’s Blessing

Lord, we thank you for the bounty you have placed before us.

We thank you for this day of love and joy.

We thank you for allowing us to be together 

to share with each other and with you 

the fullness of our hearts on this special day.

—from A Christmas Carol (1984)

Happy Christmas Eve!

Happy Christmas Eve!

Happy Winter Solstice!

Happy Winter Solstice!

Continuing with the top winter landscapes.
3. Caspar David Friedrich ‘Winter Landscape’, 1811
From Mark Hudson: 

The German Romantic painter draws a brooding mysticality from the glow of snow and the darkness of upward-soaring pines as a cripple casts away his crutches to pray before a tiny wayside crucifix. The gothic tower rearing out of the glowing mist may be a real building or a symbolic representation of his faith.

Continuing with the top winter landscapes.

3. Caspar David Friedrich ‘Winter Landscape’, 1811

From Mark Hudson

The German Romantic painter draws a brooding mysticality from the glow of snow and the darkness of upward-soaring pines as a cripple casts away his crutches to pray before a tiny wayside crucifix. The gothic tower rearing out of the glowing mist may be a real building or a symbolic representation of his faith.

Last year, to celebrate the Winter Solstice, Mark Hudson of The Guardian took us on a tour of ten of art history’s most famous winter landscapes.  I will recap Mark’s excellent selections over the next couple of days here. Please enjoy!
2. Pieter Bruegel the Elder ‘The Hunters in the Snow (January)’ 1565
From Mark Hudson: 

 Updating the medieval calendar of hours to a Renaissance view, the Flemish  master says it all on the muffling effects of snow in this unforgettable image. With its  dark figures and trees seen against a glowing blanket of white and leaden sky,  Bruegel creates an archetypal sense of winter to which five centuries of realistic  portrayals have scarcely added anything.

Last year, to celebrate the Winter Solstice, Mark Hudson of The Guardian took us on a tour of ten of art history’s most famous winter landscapes.  I will recap Mark’s excellent selections over the next couple of days here. Please enjoy!

2. Pieter Bruegel the Elder ‘The Hunters in the Snow (January)’ 1565

From Mark Hudson

Updating the medieval calendar of hours to a Renaissance view, the Flemish master says it all on the muffling effects of snow in this unforgettable image. With its dark figures and trees seen against a glowing blanket of white and leaden sky, Bruegel creates an archetypal sense of winter to which five centuries of realistic portrayals have scarcely added anything.

Last year, to celebrate the Winter Solstice, Mark Hudson of The Guardian took us on a tour of ten of art history’s most famous winter landscapes.  I will recap Mark’s excellent selections over the next couple of days here. Please enjoy!
1.The Limbourg Brothers Les très riches heures du Duc de Berry: February 1412-16

From Mark Hudson:

There’s a surprising realism to this image of winter from an early 15th century calendar of hours with its contrasting hardships and pleasures – haggard labour and cosy comfort. Flattened perspective enhances the sense of everything in its place in the divinely ordained passing of the seasons.

Last year, to celebrate the Winter Solstice, Mark Hudson of The Guardian took us on a tour of ten of art history’s most famous winter landscapes.  I will recap Mark’s excellent selections over the next couple of days here. Please enjoy!

1.The Limbourg Brothers Les très riches heures du Duc de Berry: February 1412-16

From Mark Hudson:

There’s a surprising realism to this image of winter from an early 15th century calendar of hours with its contrasting hardships and pleasures – haggard labour and cosy comfort. Flattened perspective enhances the sense of everything in its place in the divinely ordained passing of the seasons.